Supporting Black-led Education

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DESPITE OVER A DECADE OF PROGRESS, MANY BLACK CHILDREN IN NEW ORLEANS FACE THE ENDURING CHALLENGE OF LACK OF ACCESS TO AN EQUITABLE, QUALITY EDUCATION. 

In 2017-2018, only one-third of all schools in Orleans Parish School District were Black-led. These schools – which employ and retain Black educators at significantly higher rates and are often led by Black education veterans – have been challenged to find resources and support in the current education landscape.  In 2016, the top philanthropic organizations donated a combined nearly $1 billion to charter schools and education organizations nationwide. Of that total, just one percent reached Black- and Latino-led organizations

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THERE CAN BE NO LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY OF EFFORTS TO DEEPEN THE QUALITY OF PUBLIC EDUCATION IN NEW ORLEANS WITHOUT ENSURING A GREATER LEVEL OF BLACK INVOLVEMENT IN EDUCATING OUR CHILDREN. 

National research on teacher diversity has established that when students are educated by professionals who look like them, there is an increase in cultural competence, higher levels of student and family engagement, and increased academic and social success (Milner 2006). One study found that access to just one Black teacher ...  

 
 

In an education landscape hampered by a dearth of high-quality seats, strengthening and sustaining a network of quality Black-led schools will positively impact school experiences for approximately one-third of New Orleans children. In New Orleans, the number of Black teachers fell from 71% in 2003-2004 to 49% in 2013-2014. In 2013, 87% of New Orleans public school students were Black compared to 54% of teachers.